Re: canyon in snow - Page 3 - Chevy Colorado & GMC Canyon
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post #41 of 169 (permalink) Old 12-06-2016, 03:51 PM
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Did not matter what you drove or what tires was on the vehicle.
I've been in situations like this before. Fortunately I was pretty lucky to avoid damage, but there's nothing quite like sliding slowly down the road on sheer ice with absolutely no control over the vehicle whatsoever. No brakes, no steering, just going where momentum and gravity want to take you.

Basically all you can do is keep lightly on the brakes hoping to feel some sign of resistance, try to keep your wheels pointed in the direction of movement, and brace for impact. All in excruciatingly slow motion.

It'll get your attention.
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post #42 of 169 (permalink) Old 12-06-2016, 05:31 PM
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I've been in situations like this before. Fortunately I was pretty lucky to avoid damage, but there's nothing quite like sliding slowly down the road on sheer ice with absolutely no control over the vehicle whatsoever.
..... many many years ago, my husband and I were driving home from an Amish Buffet out in the countryside and it was pitch dark out. No snow on the ground at all....but it was F'n cold!! I was driving this little stock Jeep Wrangler.

Hit a patch of black ice that I obviously didn't see. Just driving along and all of a sudden, the thing just started turning and did a 180 in the middle of the road. Not a damn thing I could do but HOLD ON. My husband kept saying...."Your'e Ok...You're OK" while the thing was rotating. Luckily, it finally settled facing the opposite direction and didn't hit anything. Traffic was far enough back, and saw what happened and stopped to watch the show.

Helpless and Lucky...... I'll never forget it.
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post #43 of 169 (permalink) Old 12-06-2016, 05:47 PM
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Question: what about hard rain where hydroplaning is possible. Will auto 4x4 work on those situations. Or stabilitrack / traction control be enough.
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post #44 of 169 (permalink) Old 12-06-2016, 06:00 PM
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Yesterday here in the Portland, oregon area we had the 1st snowfall under 1000ft. my house we live on a hill at 700ft so we had snow. I have dmax z71 with the stock Goodyear Adventure All Terrain tires and had no problems at all. I drove from one town with snow and slush on the roads down hill for 6 miles to the valley then back up up 3oo ft up my hill i love on in auto 4wd and no slipping. I did put 2 50lb sand bags in the back as well. i think with the right tires and knowing how to drive in snow and ice should be fine with this truck!!

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post #45 of 169 (permalink) Old 12-06-2016, 06:14 PM
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Question: what about hard rain where hydroplaning is possible. Will auto 4x4 work on those situations. Or stabilitrack / traction control be enough.
The systems (Auto 4WD, Stabilitrak/traction control) will not care about the temp. If it senses the wheel slippage, it should engage.

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post #46 of 169 (permalink) Old 12-06-2016, 07:17 PM
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Originally Posted by fernie2002chs View Post
Question: what about hard rain where hydroplaning is possible. Will auto 4x4 work on those situations. Or stabilitrack / traction control be enough.
The systems (Auto 4WD, Stabilitrak/traction control) will not care about the temp. If it senses the wheel slippage, it should engage.
I agree. It's a dream going from paved roads to mud roads and back to paved and rocky roads to grass and back to mud and then pavement.
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post #47 of 169 (permalink) Old 12-06-2016, 07:27 PM
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What always surprised me was how much better the S-10 Blazer and Tahoe performed with just the added weight associated with having a covered rear end versus an open bed. They were much better in the snow than my pickups.
I have 3-400lbs in my S-10 bed plus when it snows the weight of the snow on the tonneau cover it is like 4WD. I drive in all kinds of weather, it is amazing.
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post #48 of 169 (permalink) Old 12-07-2016, 11:10 AM
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This'll be my 3rd (Michigan) winter with my '15 Canyon 4WD, stock SLT tires. I haven't had any trouble with it once the auto/4wd is engaged. But, yeah, in 2WD, it's a handful on slick roads. ZinkehCanyon, I had a 1987 GTI and it was a handful in the snow with those wide performance tires! Maybe the newer ones come with more capable All-season tires? Anyway, where a front wheel drive vehicle will plow straighter than you're steering, and you need to stay on the gas to keep the drive wheels clawing in the right direction, a rear wheel drive will try to swap ends on you, and it's better to ease off the gas and countersteer to get on top of the skid. Find a snowy area without too many obstacles and do some controlled power slides-once you get the hang of it, you'll be fine. I've driven RWD, FWD, AWD and 4WD over the last 40 or so years, and each one took a bit of time and a little adjustment of style/expectations in order to get used to it. I'm assuming in Wisconsin that you got 4wd--just engage the auto-4wd when things are messy, don't go too fast for conditions, and you'll be fine. If not, yeah-some weight over the back axle, and give serious thought to some snow tires. Good luck!
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post #49 of 169 (permalink) Old 12-07-2016, 12:17 PM
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I've been in a lot of trucks, from 105,000lb commercial heavy haulers, to 80,000lb log trucks fully chained and still sliding down off the "beaver slide" to Dodge diesels multiple years, F150's F250's, Taco's - you name it I've probably driven it in the winter.


This Colorado ranks right up with the very best in snowy driving. I found the traction control to keep the rear in line very well even though I was trying to get it to hang out it kept going straight. It's still a truck and not an Audi Quattro or Subaru outback, but for a truck I found it to be exceptional in winter conditions. I like to turn off the TC and slide a bit but that's me.

Couple sand bags between the wheel wells, true winter tires, using the 4h knob when warranted and this truck would do juuuuust fine.

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post #50 of 169 (permalink) Old 12-07-2016, 01:28 PM
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My last 3 trucks were all 2WD. 96 S-10 regular cab with open differential, 2005 Colorado quad cab with G80 locking differential, and now a 2016 Colorado quad cab with G80 locking differential. I haven't had a chance to drive the 2016 in the snow yet but did drive the other 2 in the snow quite a bit. A couple of tips that haven't been mentioned yet besides tires and weight in the back. First one is chains or cables. I had a set for the 96 S-10 that I got at Autozone. They were more some sort of cable device rather than true chains. They worked really well and made the 2 wheel drive open differential truck drivable in some really nasty snow and ice. The big downfall for this solution is that you basically have to lay down on the ground to put them on properly which can be a hassle if you are in nice clothes. With the 2005 Colorado, I didn't get a set of cables/chains since it had the G80. I did put General Grabber AT2 tires on the back and found these tires to work really well in snow. I now have the same tire on the back of my 2016 for this winter. I also found that you can increase traction quite a bit by running your tires a little underinflated. So if you normally run 35 psi, you could run 30 psi or even 25 psi and gain some traction that way. Same principal as the CTIS systems on military vehicles that have settings for highway, cross country, and sand that adjust the tire pressure depending on the conditions you encounter. Depending on the length of your commute, what speeds you drive, and overall conditions, you may not want to leave them underinflated all the time. But lowering air pressure could get you enough traction to get unstuck or get you by in bad conditions for a short time. I carry one of the portable air compressors that plugs into the cigarette lighter so that I can air the tires back up if I let any air out to gain temporary traction.
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post #51 of 169 (permalink) Old 12-07-2016, 03:34 PM
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My last 3 trucks were all 2WD. 96 S-10 regular cab with open differential, 2005 Colorado quad cab with G80 locking differential, and now a 2016 Colorado quad cab with G80 locking differential. I haven't had a chance to drive the 2016 in the snow yet but did drive the other 2 in the snow quite a bit. A couple of tips that haven't been mentioned yet besides tires and weight in the back. First one is chains or cables. I had a set for the 96 S-10 that I got at Autozone. They were more some sort of cable device rather than true chains. They worked really well and made the 2 wheel drive open differential truck drivable in some really nasty snow and ice. The big downfall for this solution is that you basically have to lay down on the ground to put them on properly which can be a hassle if you are in nice clothes. With the 2005 Colorado, I didn't get a set of cables/chains since it had the G80. I did put General Grabber AT2 tires on the back and found these tires to work really well in snow. I now have the same tire on the back of my 2016 for this winter. I also found that you can increase traction quite a bit by running your tires a little underinflated. So if you normally run 35 psi, you could run 30 psi or even 25 psi and gain some traction that way. Same principal as the CTIS systems on military vehicles that have settings for highway, cross country, and sand that adjust the tire pressure depending on the conditions you encounter. Depending on the length of your commute, what speeds you drive, and overall conditions, you may not want to leave them underinflated all the time. But lowering air pressure could get you enough traction to get unstuck or get you by in bad conditions for a short time. I carry one of the portable air compressors that plugs into the cigarette lighter so that I can air the tires back up if I let any air out to gain temporary traction.
Reducing air pressure to increase surface area is more useful for sand than snow. Increasing the surface area on the sand will help keep you from sinking in deeper, on snow however that's the opposite of you want to do, depending on the type of snow. In most cases, increasing the pressure a little will actually help more. You don't want to sit on top of the snow as much as you want to bite through it to the road surface below. This is also why skinnier tires help in snow.
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post #52 of 169 (permalink) Old 12-07-2016, 04:10 PM
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Reducing air pressure to increase surface area is more useful for sand than snow. Increasing the surface area on the sand will help keep you from sinking in deeper, on snow however that's the opposite of you want to do, depending on the type of snow. In most cases, increasing the pressure a little will actually help more. You don't want to sit on top of the snow as much as you want to bite through it to the road surface below. This is also why skinnier tires help in snow.
As I understand it, snow tires have a smaller footprint than all seasons, this is part of the reason that they provide increased traction in snow. The same force spread over a smaller area.
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post #53 of 169 (permalink) Old 12-07-2016, 05:06 PM
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As I understand it, snow tires have a smaller footprint than all seasons, this is part of the reason that they provide increased traction in snow. The same force spread over a smaller area.
Exactly the same principle. Decreasing the air pressure increases the footprint of the tire, ie more surface area, which is not what you want in snow.

Smaller width/smaller footprint also helps to 'cut' through the snow to the surface.

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post #54 of 169 (permalink) Old 12-07-2016, 05:54 PM
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Question: what about hard rain where hydroplaning is possible. Will auto 4x4 work on those situations. Or stabilitrack / traction control be enough.
In my previous truck (without Auto4WD), I always put it in 4WD in downpours while driving on the highway. Not only does this keep things 'lubricated' regularly during the summer months - but I have this crazy belief that with the front end pulling, it can help prevent fish tailing. I guess it could help with hydroplaning - I mean, 4 driving wheels have gotta be better than 2 and should give you better steering.

Auto 4WD ? I don't know exactly how this would help or hinder.... From what I'm reading, the truck compares the speeds of both the front driveshaft to the rear driveshaft......and if the rear is going faster, then it'll send power to the front.

So.....am I wrong in thinking..... by the time the Auto 4WD sends power to the front wheels, its too late and you're already hydroplaning?

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post #55 of 169 (permalink) Old 12-07-2016, 06:02 PM
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Exactly the same principle. Decreasing the air pressure increases the footprint of the tire, ie more surface area, which is not what you want in snow.

Smaller width/smaller footprint also helps to 'cut' through the snow to the surface.
Although I agree with you in some cases...but not in all.

If you're plowing thru deep snow - you want the skinny footprint to cut thru the snow and get the wheels down to the surface of the road - with less resistance. However - On day to day commutes on roads that have hard pack snow or even ice on them, the skinny tire & higher air pressure will be like being on ice skates.

I will often reduce my air pressure in the winter for added traction in hard pack snow - similar to airing down for offroading. This also makes the tires softer...to prevent tires gashes from driving on uneven and ice chunky surfaces.

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post #56 of 169 (permalink) Old 12-07-2016, 06:35 PM
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snow tires also have a softer compound in colder weather

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post #57 of 169 (permalink) Old 12-07-2016, 08:33 PM
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In my previous truck (without Auto4WD), I always put it in 4WD in downpours while driving on the highway. Not only does this keep things 'lubricated' regularly during the summer months - but I have this crazy belief that with the front end pulling, it can help prevent fish tailing. I guess it could help with hydroplaning - I mean, 4 driving wheels have gotta be better than 2 and should give you better steering.

Auto 4WD ? I don't know exactly how this would help or hinder.... From what I'm reading, the truck compares the speeds of both the front driveshaft to the rear driveshaft......and if the rear is going faster, then it'll send power to the front.

So.....am I wrong in thinking..... by the time the Auto 4WD sends power to the front wheels, its too late and you're already hydroplaning?
I had Auto 4WD in my Trailblazer. I loved it for snow/ice that wasn't very deep - when you may not need 4WD but didn't want to realize you needed it too late. I wish I had it in my Colorado. If you gave it enough gas the rear tire would spin, then the diff would lock, then you could feel the rear end start to slide out, but then the front tire would spin and pull you forward. It was great. That was the best vehicle ever in the snow. It actually did well in 2wd but with the Auto 4WD I just put it there when there was snow or ice on the road. I only switched to 4 hi when there was a good bit of snow. The Auto 4WD worked in the deep stuff too but I could feel it going into 4WD. So if it did that a lot I'd put it in. After 200,000 miles it still worked like new.

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post #58 of 169 (permalink) Old 12-07-2016, 10:06 PM
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Doing good here this week on the snow and now ice! The auto and truck is doing well. Love this truck.

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post #59 of 169 (permalink) Old 12-08-2016, 09:11 AM
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Although I agree with you in some cases...but not in all.

If you're plowing thru deep snow - you want the skinny footprint to cut thru the snow and get the wheels down to the surface of the road - with less resistance. However - On day to day commutes on roads that have hard pack snow or even ice on them, the skinny tire & higher air pressure will be like being on ice skates.

I will often reduce my air pressure in the winter for added traction in hard pack snow - similar to airing down for offroading. This also makes the tires softer...to prevent tires gashes from driving on uneven and ice chunky surfaces.
I'm not sure I agree with this.

A smaller footprint should work better on ice as well. Less area of potential "slip" for each pound of force. Tires aren't shaped like ice skates, but I'd point out that, while skates slip easily forward and backward, they grab pretty well from side to side.

Also I've repaired/replaced a number of tires in my life and I've never seen on punctured by ice.

If its working for you though, who am I to say? Cheers.

Edit: Check out the tire on this ice racing bike...

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post #60 of 169 (permalink) Old 12-08-2016, 09:47 AM
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I'm not sure I agree with this.

A smaller footprint should work better on ice as well. Less area of potential "slip" for each pound of force. Tires aren't shaped like ice skates, but I'd point out that, while skates slip easily forward and backward, they grab pretty well from side to side.

Also I've repaired/replaced a number of tires in my life and I've never seen on punctured by ice.

If its working for you though, who am I to say. Cheers.
I actually think you made his point. Ice skates in the direction of the skate blade slide easily, but grip well in the wider cross direction.

I am not sure that an analogy between a steel blade meant to cut into ice versus a rubber tire means a lot however. I guess a skinnier tire might tend to cut into the ice and give you better steering qualities, but when you hit the brakes, be prepared to slide like, well, a skater on ice. Surprised no one has discussed studded tires yet, or did I miss that discussion?

Outside of nails, screws, and other pieces of metal that have assaulted my tires, the only other time I have replaced a tire involved my few weeks old Wrangler. I wish I could tell some great story of traversing the Rubicon trail or some other great feat, but instead I was traveling the urban jungle we call the DFW Metroplex and a large chunk of concrete had broken off, creating a crater, but leaving the chink sitting up on the small two lane road. With no where to steer around it, the tire hit it and it sliced the side wall. The thread about TPMS pressure variations had a post about it being nice to get a warning before a tire went flat made me chuckle. This is the only time (KNOCK on wood) I have ever had a tire failure on the road personally, but the time between the hitting the concrete, having the TPMS alert, and sitting on a total flat tire was measurable in seconds that could be counted on one hand. Of course, then there was the issue that no one had the tires in stock, in fact most told me I couldn't read the tire size on my tires and I was an idiot. Took several days to get a replacement tire ordered and installed: This is why I always want a full size spare.

Back to the original premise: As others have said, this is a truck. It is going to behave differently than your old FWD vehicle. For those of us who learned to drive with rear wheel drive vehicles, it isn't quite as hard to adjust to a truck's behaviors. If this is your first RWD vehicle, especially a truck, be prepared to have to make some adjustments to your driving style.

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