First oil change V-6 only - Chevy Colorado & GMC Canyon
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post #1 of 146 (permalink) Old 12-26-2014, 09:09 PM Thread Starter
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First oil change V-6 only

Okay, I could not wait until 6000 miles To have Chevy change my oil. On my 2015 Chevy Colorado LT with the V-6. So here are some tips to help you have a easy time of it. It is a very easy change by the way.

1 You will need a 15 mm socket to remove the oil plug.
2. You will need a 24mm socket to remove oil filter.
3. 6 U.S quarts 5/30 dexos approved
4. A/C Delco # PF2129F cartridge filter
5. Large oil basin.
6. Oil rags for clean up.

Procedure-1. Run motor for a few mins and warm engine. Turn motor offf. Then, place catch basin under truck, right below the oil drain plug. Use socket wrench with 15mm socket. Turn to left to loosen. it will begin to drip slowly as you unscrew the plug. When you get near the end though move basin far to the left. When you pull the plug, the flow arches very far, farther than any car I've ever changed oil on. Then move basin as flow reduces.
After you let oil drain for 5 mins and no more oil is dripping down, replace drain plug. (Truck should be slightly warm so oil flows well). Also don't forget to go to dealer and get new gasket and replace drain plug gasket periodically.

As far as identifying the oil drain plug, it's at the bottom of the engine, not the transmission, which is farther back. It's the plug closest to the front debris shield that protects the bottom side of the engine from rocks and such. The oil pan on this truck have a very distinctive look. It looks like a upside down mountain with the peak flattened. The plug is mounted horizontal pointing towards the passenger side of the truck. Its 15mm in size.

2. After you replace the drain plug, thighten it snug tight. Manuel says 15lb of torque. Don't over tighten. Next use a socket wrench with a long extension with a 24mm socket on the end to remove oil filter which is located on top side of engine on right. Twist socket to the left to loosen, then hand loosen. Place rag near as you pull cap up and around some hoses to remove cartridge filter. Very little oil drips.
My filter remained attached to cap. If yours doesn't come out with cap, pull filter out by hand. The paper cartridge has two gaskets, one on the top and one at the bottom of the filter. Make sure both gaskets come out with paper filter. When I pulled mine out of the cap, the one gasket stuck to the bottom of the cap. (See attached picture to see stuck gasket) I then got a pair of needle nose pliers and pulled it off. There is a another ring gasket on base of the cap. It's blue in color and looks like a skinny rubber band. Take that one off too with needle nose (carefully) and replace with new one that comes with filter. Since there are multiple grooves, make sure to place new gasket back in same exact groove that you removed the old one from. Then take some clean oil and lubricator threads on cap to facilitate easy installation and removal next time.

3. Place new filter in cap (will snug into place) and carefully maneuver cap back into engine bay, again around the hoses, and slowly place filter and cap in original opening. Twist by hand until snug. Then take a torque wrench and 24mm socket with extension and tighten to 22lb ft pd. it's marked on top of cap.

4. Next, remove oil fill cap (top, right side of engine.) if you haven't already and place funnel in hole. Do not place funnel too far down hole or oil will not enter engine. Position it just inside opening. Specs call for 6 U.S. Qt of 5/30. Poor oil slowly. If you pour too fast it will back up. I placed my used oil back into the new containers that I just emptied. Six qts seem just right, but always double check dip stick for proper settings.

5. Run motor, check for leaks, after about a min turn motor offf ( unless it's leaking then turn it off right away and check problem are for issues.) Then, give it a few mins to drain back into bottom of engine pan, and recheck dip stick for proper levels. Then you're done!

Disclaimer: These are just somethings I observed when changing my oil for the first time in my new truck. I am not a professional mechanic, nor claim to be a expert. but I wanted to pass on some items that may make your first oil change on your new truck a little easier. Always follow your manufacturers procedures for warranty and safety.
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Last edited by Thor18; 01-29-2015 at 05:31 PM.
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post #2 of 146 (permalink) Old 12-26-2014, 09:56 PM
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Where is 08Canyon when you need him?
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‘16 Colorado LT CC LB Duramax - Brownstone, Bose, Luxury Pkg, Safety Pkg, Convenience Pkg, Trailering Pkg/Locking rear diff, Wheel flares, BORA 1.5" wheel spacers, Iron Cross Patriot Running Boards, Line-X. Planned mods: Zone 1.25" level. SOLD: '15 Colorado LT V6. Threw kitty litter on that turd....... and dumped it!
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post #3 of 146 (permalink) Old 12-26-2014, 10:04 PM
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Great instructions. I am reading on my phone so hard to follow. Did you miss an important step? I don't see where you replace the plug on bottom of pan.

I also saw somewhere where someone mentioned to not confuse the oil drain plug with the transmission drain plug. Not sure how you do that but they complained that the pans were not labelled.

2015 Canyon SLT, Copper Red, 2WD, CC, SB, V6, Tow, blk leather, factory spray liner, safety pkg, generic roll up bed cover.
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post #4 of 146 (permalink) Old 12-26-2014, 11:13 PM
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Originally Posted by Thor18 View Post
Disclaimer: These are just somethings I observed when changing my oil for the first time in my new truck. I am not a professional mechanic, nor claim to be a expert. but I wanted to pass on some items that may make your first oil change on your new truck a little easier. Always follow your manufacturers procedures for warranty and safety.
To his defense he did apply a disclaimer, Maybe he is the one who changed oil on the other guys truck that left dealership with no oil pressure. J/k
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post #5 of 146 (permalink) Old 12-26-2014, 11:28 PM Thread Starter
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Great instructions. I am reading on my phone so hard to follow. Did you miss an important step? I don't see where you replace the plug on bottom of pan.

I also saw somewhere where someone mentioned to not confuse the oil drain plug with the transmission drain plug. Not sure how you do that but they complained that the pans were not labelled.
I updated the instructions. But to repeat in this thread for ease of reading.

1. After you let oil drain for 5 mins and no more oil is dripping down, replace drain plug. (Truck should be slightly warm so oil flows well).

2. As far as the oil drain plug, its at the bottom of the engine, not the transmission which is farther back. its the plug closest to the front debris shield that protects the bottom side of the engine from rocks and such. The oil pan on this truck have a very distinctive look. It looks like a upside down mountain with the peak flattened. The plug is mounted horizontal pointing towards the passenger side of the truck. Its 15mm in size.

Hope that clarifies things for you. As far as those who think this thread is unnecessary, you are mistaken. A lot of the younger kids now a days don't even know what a crescent wrench is. Just trying to encourage others to do things themselves and not have to rely on stealerships that charge you outrages amounts for simple maintenance that can be done at home for half the cost.

Last edited by Thor18; 12-26-2014 at 11:50 PM.
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post #6 of 146 (permalink) Old 12-26-2014, 11:53 PM
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I struggled early on and removed a bunch of bolts before I found the drain plug. I finally took a label machine and an exploded diagram and labeled and indexed the entire undercarriage. Things are much better now!
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‘16 Colorado LT CC LB Duramax - Brownstone, Bose, Luxury Pkg, Safety Pkg, Convenience Pkg, Trailering Pkg/Locking rear diff, Wheel flares, BORA 1.5" wheel spacers, Iron Cross Patriot Running Boards, Line-X. Planned mods: Zone 1.25" level. SOLD: '15 Colorado LT V6. Threw kitty litter on that turd....... and dumped it!
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post #7 of 146 (permalink) Old 12-26-2014, 11:59 PM
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Where is 08Canyon when you need him?
I'm here! I'm here!

But what do I need to be here for?
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post #8 of 146 (permalink) Old 12-27-2014, 12:06 AM
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I'm here! I'm here!

But what do I need to be here for?
Sorry, I couldn't wait!

‘16 Colorado LT CC LB Duramax - Brownstone, Bose, Luxury Pkg, Safety Pkg, Convenience Pkg, Trailering Pkg/Locking rear diff, Wheel flares, BORA 1.5" wheel spacers, Iron Cross Patriot Running Boards, Line-X. Planned mods: Zone 1.25" level. SOLD: '15 Colorado LT V6. Threw kitty litter on that turd....... and dumped it!
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post #9 of 146 (permalink) Old 12-27-2014, 12:12 AM
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Good instructions. as far as younger kids not knowing and trying to help them out you may not be, The reason I say this is they probably dont have the tools and when you talk torque wrenches you are laying out a little for one,plus every thing else tht you need so cuts back on your savings. They wont have the knowledge to look at other areas that need looked at and checked like a dealer would or should anyway. But as I said it was really good instructions for someone that is use to doing their own now.
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post #10 of 146 (permalink) Old 12-27-2014, 12:59 AM Thread Starter
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Good instructions. as far as younger kids not knowing and trying to help them out you may not be, The reason I say this is they probably dont have the tools and when you talk torque wrenches you are laying out a little for one,plus every thing else tht you need so cuts back on your savings. They wont have the knowledge to look at other areas that need looked at and checked like a dealer would or should anyway. But as I said it was really good instructions for someone that is use to doing their own now.
I would agree with you about the point that a kid may not check everything a dealership might, but kids grow up and even young men and women that have never changed a light bulb have to start somewhere. And as time goes on and their confidence grows with every new project they attempt, they will learn to look at the more important items. I'm not downplaying the usefulness of a dealer or independent mechanic. They have their place. But wouldn't it be nice that when you are 80 years old and don't feel like crawling underneath your truck yourself or because you can't afford to pay the $1800 for a oil change in the year 2030 that your grandchild read my post and learned how to change the oil for you. My son started with a oil change and is now a mechanical engineer building his own components for his truck. You have to have a starting point and a oil change is a good place to start. As far as them not having the tools. Well if they don't inherit them, then maybe they should start buying wrenches instead of video games. Just remember, " Learning a lttle bit at a time won't hurt you, but knowing just a little can!"

Just food for thought.
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Last edited by Thor18; 12-27-2014 at 01:27 AM.
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post #11 of 146 (permalink) Old 12-27-2014, 07:36 AM
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Thanks. Nice job,saves me from taking a pile of wrenches under the truck.
I also think some of the younger generation should learn how to do things themselves. Not only do we save money but u can make sure it is done right.
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post #12 of 146 (permalink) Old 12-27-2014, 10:46 AM
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Thanks. Nice job,saves me from taking a pile of wrenches under the truck.
I picked up an oil extractor a few years ago and haven't had to crawl under the truck since. For those who aren't familiar with them, it's a container with a hose with a slim end on it that goes down the dipstick tube to the bottom of the oil pan. It comes with a pump to put a vacuum on the container, it pulls the warm oil out while you have time to check the other fluids. It really does a good job of getting all the oil out of the pan.

I understand there are some vehicles being made now that don't even have a drain plug.
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post #13 of 146 (permalink) Old 12-27-2014, 10:53 AM
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Good clear instructions on oil change procedure. I'll file this away for after my 4 free dealer changes expire. Thanks again.
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post #14 of 146 (permalink) Old 12-27-2014, 01:02 PM
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I picked up an oil extractor a few years ago and haven't had to crawl under the truck since. For those who aren't familiar with them, it's a container with a hose with a slim end on it that goes down the dipstick tube to the bottom of the oil pan. It comes with a pump to put a vacuum on the container, it pulls the warm oil out while you have time to check the other fluids. It really does a good job of getting all the oil out of the pan.

I understand there are some vehicles being made now that don't even have a drain plug.
The one thing I can think of as a negative to that tool;
Once the oil has settled, you are not 'draining' the contaminants that are sitting on the surface of the oil pan. You can only pull out the contaminants that are floating in the oil.

I guess though, the filter will catch whatever is left behind.

I supposes if there is no other option to change the oil (like the person is unable to get under the vehicle), this option is better than not changing oil at all.
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post #15 of 146 (permalink) Old 12-27-2014, 01:52 PM
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When I change my oil the first time, I will do what I have done on every new vehicle that I have bought in the last 30 years. I will install a Fumoto Quick Oil Drain Valve. I don't do any off roading and have never had any problem with them whatsoever. Makes it sooooo easy. If my memory serves me, I believe that I ordered a 107. Look it up to be sure.
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post #16 of 146 (permalink) Old 12-27-2014, 07:12 PM
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I used to change my own oil but it's messy and kind of a pain in the ass. I just take it to the shop or an oil change place now and get it done. It's not that much money anyway, and a lot less laying on my back with **** falling in my face, and no more oil stains on my garage floor. B-)
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post #17 of 146 (permalink) Old 12-27-2014, 07:16 PM
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Okay, I could not wait until 6000 miles To have Chevy change my oil.
Does GM limit the free oil changes to 6000 mile intervals or do they just limit the total number to (4)?
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post #18 of 146 (permalink) Old 12-27-2014, 08:26 PM
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Seriously Thor, you should also do a write up on how to change a tire and the proper positioning of the jack.
If you think the younger generation has never done an oil change ask them about changing a tire. Especially trying to get an impact wrenched lug nut off.
I guess they never have a flat on a back road with no cell service to call for help.
Just last year I was stomping on my lug wrench on a dirt road in Nowhere Montana trying to break the lug nuts free. Good thing the guy who put the new tires on wasn't walking past me at the time. I would have had a new use for the tire iron.
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post #19 of 146 (permalink) Old 12-27-2014, 09:17 PM
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I used to change my own oil but it's messy and kind of a pain in the ass. I just take it to the shop or an oil change place now and get it done. It's not that much money anyway, and a lot less laying on my back with **** falling in my face, and no more oil stains on my garage floor. B-)
I probably have not changed oil in my own vehicles for 6 years, maybe 5. For the cost differential of having a shop (oil center) do the work vs. my own cost I'm happy enough to pay out the money. Otherwise it's a trip to the store, then an hour of my time. Then transferring the oil to containers and finally taking said container to the auto store.

It's only a few times a year, so it's not like it's breaking the bank in annual oil change fees for me.

It's a great thing to know though, and I grew up doing my own maintenance. I just happen to be at a point in my life that I don't need to do every little piece of maintenance myself. I'm happy to help others work on their vehicles if needed, but it's rare I'm up for a lot of work on my own. I do tinker though....
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post #20 of 146 (permalink) Old 12-27-2014, 09:22 PM
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Out of curiosity, what is an average max torque of an impact gun at a shop that replaces tires?
With that said, how much torque can the treads of the studs take before they strip?

I do not mean to question the strength of people, that is not my intent....but is it actually possible to put on a lugnut so tightly that it can't be removed by an average person? I understand there are other situations that can 'tighten' a nut, like rust for example.

But in theory, is the impact wrench the sole reason why a lug nut can't be removed? I mean we remove 300lbft nuts from hubs with hand tools. I think a head bolt can take 200lbft of torque? Why can't we remove a lug nut?

I'm just thinking....if I went and had a tire replaced today then had a flat immediately after, while driving home. Is the lug not going to be stuck if the shop-hand used an impact gun to tighten the wheels?
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