Radiator hose heater - Chevy Colorado & GMC Canyon
 
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post #1 of 10 (permalink) Old 12-16-2016, 08:35 AM Thread Starter
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Radiator hose heater

I have a 1948 Ford 8N tractor that I have installed a radiator lower hose heater...it works well at warming the old girl in cold weather and as an aid to starting.

I have a 2007 LS standard cab, Colorado that is not all that quick to start (hard starting even when a trouble light is left on the side of the engine all night), in cold weather inasmuch as it sits outside, never inside.

Is there any reason I should not install one of those hose heaters in the lower hose on my Colorado?
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post #2 of 10 (permalink) Old 12-16-2016, 11:52 AM
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Keep in mind that the Colorado cooling system has the thermostat in the lower radiator hose. That arrangement will block warm coolant flow from lower radiator type of heater through the engine. Look at a block heater, or one that goes incline with a heater hose, or a stick on one on the oil pan instead.

2005 White 2wd Z71 WT
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post #3 of 10 (permalink) Old 12-16-2016, 04:43 PM Thread Starter
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Ahhh! That is the type of thing I was concerned about...problems/issues native to Colorado's that I did not anticipate. When I grew-up ( I am old now), all vehicles had their thermostats in the top hose, not the bottom. Who would have figured? Thanks for the input.
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post #4 of 10 (permalink) Old 12-16-2016, 05:29 PM
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GM provided a block heater as an accessory, but I don't see it available as a package and buying the two parts separate is quite expensive. The applicable heater, part number 12587380, and the matching cord, part number 15261269, will set you back about $175. You might check with a Dealer and see if the heater is still available as a package and if it might be cheaper.

One good thing is that the heater just installs in a hole in the block and doesn't require messing with the coolant.

http://www.wholesalegmpartsonline.co.../12587380.html
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post #5 of 10 (permalink) Old 12-16-2016, 09:57 PM
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I have used both the block heater and the circulating water heater. I liked the circulating water much better. It goes inline on your heater hose and you actually get the windshield somewhat defrosted from the residual heat going through your heater core. Upon start up the cabin heat gets hotter faster than with a conventional block heater as the water is already warm.
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post #6 of 10 (permalink) Old 12-17-2016, 03:06 AM
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I have the GM Block heater on my Colorado. Since the truck is parked inside, I never use it. I also have a block heater on my John Deere diesel. Without it I would never get it started when the temp goes below 20 and I need to plow snow. I think the block heater is the best solution but is also the most difficult to install.

I have the silicone pad on my airplane engine. (Air cooled - no antifreeze to heat.) It works well. I use it whenever the temp goes below 32. I use to carry a small 2 cycle generator in the airplane to run it when I was parked at small unattended airports in the winter with no place to plug in.

There are lots of options.

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post #7 of 10 (permalink) Old 01-02-2017, 12:38 PM Thread Starter
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Update!

I took my 2007 Colorado LS in this A.M. to have a block heater installed (Kat's 11455). However, the mechanic said he could find no place to install it (threaded freeze plug), as per my diagram (TS01-709). He stated that he looked in the area on the side of the engine, accessible from the driver's side wheel well, with the wheel and the skirting removed. What is going on here? No threaded freeze plug there for my model, or is the mechanic in error?

Also, they told me that my starter was drawing 150 amps whereas it should only be drawing about 100, so that could be why my truck is so difficult to start (and starter does not want to disengage when key is released), in very cold weather (in the teens and below). The truck was warm when they checked the amps, so I imagine that when very cold, it would draw more than 150 amps. Furthermore, he said that when a starter draws 200 amps, he counsels for a new starter. Does all this sound right to you guys?

Should I be looking for a new mechanic?
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post #8 of 10 (permalink) Old 01-02-2017, 02:40 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by n9cv View Post
Keep in mind that the Colorado cooling system has the thermostat in the lower radiator hose. That arrangement will block warm coolant flow from lower radiator type of heater through the engine. Look at a block heater, or one that goes incline with a heater hose, or a stick on one on the oil pan instead.
If you heat the water in the lower hose, and the thermostat is in the lower hose, wouldn't that cause the thermostat to open? And wouldn't that be a good thing? IDK, I'v never used one like this.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ststefan10 View Post
I have used both the block heater and the circulating water heater. I liked the circulating water much better.
I used a block heater on a 5.9l Cummins. Even when near or slightly below 0*F, it didn't seem to help all that much. A little, but not a lot. If I had paid extra for it, I would have been disappointed.

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Originally Posted by Bushranger View Post
Also, they told me that my starter was drawing 150 amps whereas it should only be drawing about 100, so that could be why my truck is so difficult to start (and starter does not want to disengage when key is released), in very cold weather (in the teens and below). The truck was warm when they checked the amps, so I imagine that when very cold, it would draw more than 150 amps. Furthermore, he said that when a starter draws 200 amps, he counsels for a new starter. Does all this sound right to you guys?
For a gas V8, that would be accurate; they rarely draw more than 100-125 amps. But IDK what the amp rating is for this engine. With 16:1 compression, it might need more. I'd call the dealer service dept and ask them. Still under warrenty? Also, loose or bad cables can cause similar problems.

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2016 Colorado: long bed, Z71, Mini-Duramax
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post #9 of 10 (permalink) Old 01-02-2017, 03:38 PM Thread Starter
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No hyjacking please!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bushranger View Post
I took my 2007 Colorado LS in this A.M. to have a block heater installed (Kat's 11455). However, the mechanic said he could find no place to install it (threaded freeze plug), as per my diagram (TS01-709). He stated that he looked in the area on the side of the engine, accessible from the driver's side wheel well, with the wheel and the skirting removed. What is going on here? No threaded freeze plug there for my model, or is the mechanic in error?

Also, they told me that my starter was drawing 150 amps whereas it should only be drawing about 100, so that could be why my truck is so difficult to start (and starter does not want to disengage when key is released), in very cold weather (in the teens and below). The truck was warm when they checked the amps, so I imagine that when very cold, it would draw more than 150 amps. Furthermore, he said that when a starter draws 200 amps, he counsels for a new starter. Does all this sound right to you guys?

Should I be looking for a new mechanic?
Please do not hijack my thread...stick to the issues I have posted in the quote above.
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post #10 of 10 (permalink) Old 01-04-2017, 05:00 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by .boB View Post
If you heat the water in the lower hose, and the thermostat is in the lower hose, wouldn't that cause the thermostat to open? And wouldn't that be a good thing? IDK, I'v never used one like this.

***SNIP **

.
NO, The thermostat is facing the wrong way and it will only open when the engine coolant (not the coolant in the lower hose) exceeds 180 or 195 F.

2005 White 2wd Z71 WT
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